The Cycle of Good

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Guest post by Eric Maughan

One of my favorite Bible verses is Acts 10:38, which says that Christ “went about doing good.” I often think of the effect his service had on the people around him, how all those acts of goodness must have influenced their behavior. It’s hard to see someone doing a good thing and not want to do something good yourself. This “cycle of good”—being helped and then helping others—is one of the great things about the world we live in.

Sometimes the cycle of good is born out of tragedy. In 2009, twenty-seven-year-old John Jones was exploring a cave in northern Utah when he got stuck upside down. After more than twenty-four hours of fighting and valiant efforts by rescuers, John passed away, leaving his pregnant widow and thirteen-month-old daughter. Amidst the tragedy, John’s brother-in-law and I saw an opportunity to help others, and we organized a cross-country bicycle ride to raise money for young widows and their children, like John’s young family. Since he had lived his life serving and helping people, we were inspired by John’s actions and wanted to help inspire others.

We set out to help and inspire others, but as we made our way across the country we were instead the recipients of countless acts of people “doing good” like Christ did. An example of this was a man named Doug, who offered to let us spend the night at his home in North Carolina. We needed to take a ferry to get there, but we missed the last ferry that would have allowed us to safely bike to Doug’s house before sunset.  We called Doug and told him we would just sleep in our tents when we got off the ferry, but he said he would be happy to come pick us up with his truck and trailer. When we thanked him profusely, he told us a story about a time when he had been the one in need of help.

Doug was taking a group of youth up a canyon when their trailer got a flat tire. Fortunately, this occurred close to a house where a man had a spare that was a perfect match. The homeowner gave Doug a hand and sent him on his way without accepting any sort of compensation. Doug said that he promised himself then to lend a hand whenever he could, which was why he came out to pick us up.

I have 4,000 miles worth of stories of the “cycle of good” in action. I noticed while we were biking that some people thought we were trying to “[go] about doing good” in our own small way, and I hope that inspired them to do good as well. I try to remember every day the people that have gone out of their way to help me, and those that still do, and I try to pass those acts of kindness on as the “cycle of good” continues.

One thought on “The Cycle of Good

  1. Brint

    Most of the ‘miracles’ in my life have occurred as a result of a choice that someone made to do a simple act of kindness. A small hinge can open a large door … these small acts of kindness freely offered have blessed my life and the lives of my family. Knowing this, I am much more mindful of the needs and struggles of others and motivated to ‘pay forward’ the kindness that I have received.

    Reply

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